Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

Posted on Posted in Blog, Color Me Educated, Science

Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

 
I love science, do you?  The great thing about science, I think, is that there is something for everybody.  If you are interested in how the body works, you got anatomy and biology.  If you’re interested in plants – you got botany.  Or perhaps rocks float your boat – then you have geology.  There is absolutely something that every child can learn to love about science. Another plus for science is that it makes you think!  Your kiddo may just be the one who finds the cure to cancer or diabetes! No better place to get started then this summer!!

 

For the Big Kids:

 Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

What will they comprehend? How the structures of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids are related to their functions in organisms.

Note: Carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids are familiar because foods we eat contain these macromolecules.  After eating these foods, your body breaks them down into their subunits and uses them to make up the components of your cells.
Have your high schooler review this chart

MOLECULE

EXAMPLES of the MOLECULE

FUNCTION

DIETARY SOURCE
EXAMPLE?

Carbohydrate Glucose and sucrose Initial energy source cells use to create ATP (ultimate energy source) Potatoes, pastas, table sugar
Protein Enzymes, hemoglobin, actin Perform most of the body’s tasks needed to function Nuts, animal products
Lipid Steroids, Triglycerides (i.e. fats & oils), Phospholipids Chemical messengers, Energy source stored for later use, Membrane components Olive oil, butter
Nucleic acid DNA and RNA Instructions for making proteins Not applicable
Is your high schooler one for pictures…maybe a little graphics are needed for comprehension? No fear, have them review each of these tutorials on carbohydrates

 Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

 

Lipids
 and...
Proteins

 Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

 
Have your teen to go through the fridge and find examples of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Perhaps they can take pictures on their phone and send them to you (categorized of course) while you are at work.
Lastly, have your teen write down a healthy meal and compare it with a meal from a restaurant.  They can make up a meal from the items they took out the fridge.  Then visit this site with listings of meals from different restaurants, i.e. Applebee’s, Cracker Barrel etc.   [Note: Perhaps this will help them if they are looking to gain weight for the upcoming football season.  Or lose weight to stay in shape.]  Have them identify the carbohydrates, proteins and lipids.  Then have them write up how this meal will impact the body (hopefully positively) by using this nutritional recipe calculator.

 

 

 

Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

What will they learn? How genetic information is transferred from parent to offspring in organisms that reproduce sexually. And how to use models (Punnett squares) to describe and predict patterns of the inheritance of single genetic traits from parent to offspring (including dominant and recessive traits).

 

The Gene Screen App is a great way to make sure your upcoming seventh grader is ahead of the science game.  They can review the app while you’re at work.  

 Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

Have them go through the Learn About Genetics section and write down five things they learned (to be given to you once you get home) from each of the four categories.
Have them do the same for the Inheritance Calculators section (which I might add is cool to play around with). 
Have your middle schooler look through the Map of Genetic Diseases.  Click on By Disease.  Choose three diseases they are interested in.  Then have them research why the disease they chose may be more prevalent here than in other places.  Make sure they include how they believe genetics has played a part.
 
Don’t have an iPad? No worries. Use this website instead to have your middle schooler take notes on what they’ve learned about genes and heredity as they go through the following sections:
Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science
What is Heredity?
What is a Trait?
What are Dominant and Recessive?
Have them create a “What’s Your Family Healthy Story?’ By the time you get home from work have them:
 Call some family members and complete the ‘Healthy Family Tree Information’ questionnaire (page 3).               
Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science
 
Determine what relationships can they point out?
What healthy suggestions would they make for the entire family based off of what they found?

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the elementary kids:

Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

What will they learn? Obtain and communicate information about severe weather phenomena (including thunderstorms, hurricanes, and tornadoes) to explain steps humans can take to reduce the impact of severe weather phenomena.

 

Help bolster interest in weather by having your fourth grader Create-a-cane.  While you’re at work have them write down what conditions they created to create a hurricane.

Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

Hurricane Maker is also a neat site.  Again if the kiddos use this site have them write down what conditions they created for a storm to occur.

 Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

 

Tell your whiz kid that they are in charge! Have them look at a map of your state.  Ask them to create an exit route. If there was hurricane or major storm what highways and interstates would they suggest people take?
Have them write down five ways they would protect people and keep them safe in the case of severe weather. Make sure they explain why they believe these five ways will keep people safe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the Preschool and Kindergarten kids:

 Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science

What will they learn? Conduct an investigation to determine what plants need to live and grow (i.e. water and light).

 

Take the Plant or Animal_What Does it Need to Grow below outside or perhaps around the house and have your little one point out plants and animals.  Talk with them about what each will need to live and grow.
 Summer Edition – No Summer Sliding Here in Science
Take an extra step and plant something.  A trip to Lowe’s (or through the garage) pointing out the soil, water and all else that’s needed to make the seed grow is a great learning experience about what’s needed for plants to grow.

 

 

Happy Summer Learning! Here’s to Closing the Achievement Gap!

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