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From Kindergarten to Graduation: The End is Just as Important as the Beginning

Posted on Posted in Blog, Parenting's Not Easy, School Me on Research

From Kindergarten to Graduation: The End is Just as Important as the Beginning

 
What do you think is more important, the beginning or the end or the parts in the middle? I used to think the end. Now, I am not so certain. Take exercising for example. For the longest I have had a nagging need to get in shape. I want to be able to pound up the stairs like my kiddos, two at a time with not one hesitation or need to rest on the bannister when I reach the top. Plus, I’d like to think that one day I could work my arm strength up to the point where I can do minimum three push- ups in a row. I thought that reaching my goals would be the bigger deal, but now I believe the journey to get there may be just as, if not more, important than the end.
Our ultimate educational goal for us as parents is to make sure we raise children who graduate from college and lead successful careers.  I used to think that high school would be the major apex of our three’s schooling experience.  High school is the time when they will take the SAT, pick out a college and route out a plan (albeit flexible) for their future career/life.  
It seems to me now that high school is the parent educational culmination of reading books at bedtime when they were little, attending parent teacher conferences, checking behavior charts and homework agenda books, a million hours of homework and tutoring time.  Besides the time spent on our children to help them succeed in school, there are also other factors we don’t necessarily think about which also impact their educational success. The National Center for Education Statistics released a report today detailing the many variables that impact educational success for kindergarten and first graders. Such as:
  •  Parent’s educational level -  the higher a parents educational level the higher the children’s scores on standardized reading, math, and science tests.
  • Two-parent households – children from two parent household scored higher in reading, math, and science than students in single-parent and other parent type households.
  • Students with a primary home language of English. (Students scored higher in reading, math, and science than students with a non-English primary home language and students with multiple home languages).
Most notable is the fact that such variables impact the educational performance of children of color the most.
 
 
Whether it’s exercising or parenting three kiddos through school, so far I’ve come to the conclusion that the parts in the middle seem to be the most important part of all.  As the parts in the middle will get us to a hopeful successful end.

 

What do you think is more important, the beginning, the end or the middle parts of parenting?

 

 

 

 

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