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On the Way to Grandma’s House: Books and Conversation for Kids, Tweens and Teens

Posted on Posted in Blog, Color Me Educated, Reading/English

On the Way to Grandma’s House: Books and Conversation for Kids, Tweens and Teens

 
Will you and the family travel to grandmas this weekend for Mother’s Day? What better way to pass the time while off to grandma’s house than to read??  My love of reading in the car is by far one of the best traditions that my mama started.  While daddy drove she showed me how you could make good use of an hour and a half to devour a few chapters.
While we travel I am definitely pulling out the books especially since reading in front of the kiddos makes such a great impression.   Regardless, even if the kiddos aren’t particularly inspired by me reading I will be requiring at least thirty minutes of reading time.  I mean what else do you do in a car or plane for hours? There are only so many naps to take and so many pine trees to view.  Plus, it can’t hurt to remind the kiddos, through great Mother’s Day books, just how wonderful a mother you are!

 

High and Middle School

 

Annie John

 

An adored only child, Annie has until recently lived an idyllic life. She is inseparable from her beautiful mother, a powerful presence, who is the very center of the little girl’s existence. Loved and cherished, Annie grows and thrives within her mother’s benign shadow. Looking back on her childhood, she reflects, “It was in such a paradise that I lived.” When she turns twelve, however, Annie’s life changes, in ways that are often mysterious to her. She begins to question the cultural assumptions of her island world; at school she instinctively rebels against authority; and most frighteningly, her mother, seeing Annie as a “young lady,” ceases to be the source of unconditional adoration and takes on the new and unfamiliar guise of adversary. 

 

After getting a great read in your genius’ hands spark up a conversation about the book! While they are reading this book you could ask:
  • Is the mother powerful and the daughter powerless?
  • What kind of power does the daughter discover in herself?

 

Toning The Sweep (middle grade)

Three generations of African American women, each holding on to a separate truth. Their story -- encompassing racism and murder as well as the family commonplaces that make a life -- is one that readers will never forget.
After getting a great read in your genius’ hands spark up a conversation about the book! While they are reading this book you could ask:
  • How do they feel about the relationship between the grandmother and granddaughter, or mother and daughter?
  • What do they think it would be like to be a black in Alabama in 1964?

 

 

 

Elementary

 

Mister and Me (Older Elementary)

When Jolene learns that big, loud Mister wants to marry Momma, she feels as if she might lose her, just like she lost her father. Three is enough, but what if her momma doesn't think so? Jolene is sad and scared, but she is tough too. And when she gets the chance to hurt Mister, she acts.
What will Momma do when she finds out? And will she marry Mister anyway?
After getting a great read in your genius’ hands spark up a conversation about the book! While they are reading this book you could ask:
  • Why does Jolene say that she doesn’t like to have Mr. Leroy around?
  • If you were Mister Leroy would you have been mad at Jolene?

 

Sugar Plum Ballerinas #1: Plum Fantastic  (Younger Elementary)

 

Alexandrea has just moved from small-town Georgia to New York City's Harlem where her mother hopes to launch a costume-making business. The nine-year-old feels like she's in another world, except that Mama is still forcing her to take ballet, even though Alex dreams of becoming a speed skater like her idol Phoebe Fitz. The first day of class is made even worse, since her mother forces her to wear a wild creation—a tutu resembling a "pink puff pastry." When Alex is randomly assigned the coveted role of Sugar Plum Fairy in the school's summer performance, she is terrified and shunned by the other dancers. Practice doesn't help, and she seriously considers giving up the part. However, after seeing Phoebe Fitz on television talking about the importance of ballet, Alex determines to try her best.

 

After getting a great read in your genius’ hands spark up a conversation about the book! While they are reading this book you could ask:
  • Talk about a time when you or your kiddos were the new person, how did it make them feel? How did they overcome their fears?
  • Would you wear your moms costume designs even if you didn’t like them?

 

 

 

Kindergarten

 

Tell Me A Story Mama

 

Mama begins to tell her young daughter a bedtime story, but the little girl soon takes over the narration, telling the familiar tale about the time Grandma had to send Mama and Aunt Jessie to St. Louis by train alone.

 

Llama, Llama Home with Mama
 

 

 

 

 

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